X

 

G

UEST

REGISTRATION

 

 

 

or

 

 
CREATE ACCOUNT

 

O

WNER

REGISTRATION

 

 
Do you own or did you order a Ferrari?
Register and gain access to the Owners' section, where you will find all the services dedicated you.
REGISTER NOW

 

O

WNER

REGISTRATION

 

 
Do you own or did you order a Ferrari?
Register and gain access to the Owners' section, where you will find all the services dedicated you.
REGISTER NOW
 

Montezemolo salutes the Ferrari Cavalcade

More than 300 kilometres of road winding its way through the most beautiful corners of Tuscany provided the backdrop for the second edition of the Ferrari Cavalcade. The 90 participating client-collectors, some at the wheels of unique cars of the likes of the Enzo and the SA Aperta, set out from Florence bound for Volterra this morning. The large crowd waiting for the cars in the ancient Etruscan city was surprised to see the white FF of none other than Ferrari Chairman Luca di Montezemolo leading the parade and, of course, his presence drew enthusiastic applause from participants and public alike. The Cavalcade then moved on to Bolgheri and next to the Tenuta dell’Ornellaia where they were welcomed by the Marchesi Frescobaldi.

The cars made another stop on the return route to Florence, this time at one of Italy’s many UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the town of San Gimignano, which is also known as the Manhattan of the Middle Ages because of the 72 towers and tower houses that dotted its sky in the days of the Italian City States. Today, just 16 remain but the town still retains its extraordinary beauty and allure.

“Our best clients and most dedicated collectors all gathered together to share their passion for the Prancing Horse and their Ferraris by exploring Italy’s most beautiful landscapes and visiting unique locales open only to them: that is the Cavalcade,” is how Luca di Montezemolo describes the philosophy of the event. A philosophy mirrored too in the venue for tonight’s dinner: the Great Cloister of Santa Maria Novella, built between 1340 and 1360, and famous for its frescoes. Today, the Cloister, which is Florence’s largest, houses the Carabinieri Officers’ School and, as such, is normally closed to the public. However, an exception has been made for Ferrari!

Discover the official
Ferrari Magazine

9591