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Overview

Ferrari
F430 Spider

The F430 Spider joins the F430 as the latest addition to the new generation of Ferrari V8-engined sports cars. The F430 Spider’s innovative aerodynamics, honed to generate dynamic air flows to increase down-force and improve cooling, and the F1 gearbox featuring upgraded software, are just two examples of how Ferrari’s technological excellence has been transferred from the track to road.

The F430 Spider’s all-aluminium bodywork and chassis have also been carefully strengthened, to guarantee both occupant safety and the structural rigidity demanded by a car of such high performance.

Two very robust steel roll-bars are integrated into the windshield structure to guarantee maximum occupant protection. The electric hood is fully automatic and folds away under its own flush-fitting tonneau cover, allowing Ferrari engineers to hone the aerodynamics of the car with the hood down.

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Ferrari_F430-spider-front-three-quarter-view
Ferrari_F430-spider_back-lateral-three-quarter-view

DESIGN

Design & Styling

Created by Pininfarina, the F430 Spider is inspired by the car’s exceptional engineering and Formula 1. The nose, which is characterised by two distinctive air intakes, draws inspiration from the Ferrari 156 F1 that Phil Hill drove to his F1 World Championship title in 1961. The Enzo Ferrari was the inspiration for much of the rear styling of the new F430 Spider, and the Ferrari meticulous aerodynamic detailing is reflected in the design of the nolder incorporated into the engine cover and the new rear diffuser integrated into the bumper, which boasts race-derived dimensions.

Extreme care has also been lavished on designing the exterior details. The wing mirrors now have specially profiled twin mounting arms that channel air flows to the engine intakes, and the F430 name has been embossed on the back of the driver’s side mirror. Even the finish of the engine bay is a work of art in terms of its distinctive shape and materials.

Launche the 360° EXPLORE


The interior of the F430 Spider has been redesigned for improved driver ergonomics. The interior is exceptionally innovative as well as sporty.

The instruments are housed in a new binnacle, and this design – together with the layout of the dashboard – underlines the care that has gone into grouping all the major controls within easy reach of the driver.

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Ferrari_F430-spider_interior-view
Ferrari_F430-spider_interior-view

In the driver’s direct line of sight are the rev counter, which features new graphics with a choice of either a red or yellow background and a new metal surround, the digital readout of the gear ratio selected (F1 version) and a multi-function display.

The same uncompromising approach to driver control was the inspiration behind mounting the starter button and manettino on the steering wheel.

The cockpit is noticeably bigger and the already excellent passenger comfort is improved still further by a slimmer central tunnel which houses the gear lever turret on the manual version or the F1 console on the paddle-shift version.

The seats have been redesigned for greater lateral containment too. Electric seats are available on request as is a racing version featuring a four-point safety harness (depending on market).

Each Ferrari to emerge from the factory at Maranello is absolutely unique, not just because it is hand-built, but also because a virtually endless combination of personalisation options is offered to each new owner.

A choice of 16 different bodywork and 12 different leather trim colours are available for the F430 models. These can be matched with no less than eight different carpet colours.

Ferrari_F430-spider_interior-view

The rev counter is available in either red or yellow and the inserts on the dash can be personalised in carbon-fibre or aluminium. Four different hood colours are available for the Spider: black, navy, beige or bordeaux. Ferrari’s personalisation options are completed by the exclusive and extensive “Carrozzeria Scaglietti” Personalisation Programme.

The lines of the F430 Spider (created by Pininfarina in collaboration with Ferrari’s Head of Design), were inspired by the car’s exceptional engineering.

As with every Ferrari,Pininfarina quite rightly took inspiration from the cars’exceptional engineering and performance. Long hours spent in the wind tunnel working with Ferrari’s aerodynamics specialists greatly influenced the muscular lines of both the coupé and spider versions. For instance, two distinctive elliptical air intakes channel air into the generously dimensioned radiators that cool the powerful engine.

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Ferrari_F430-spider_front-three-quarter-view

Their shape was inspired by the Ferrari 156 F1 that Phil Hill drove to his F1 World Championship title in 1961. The two intakes are linked at their lower edge by a spoiler that directs the air towards the car’s flat underbody, thus greatly improving downforce.

Ferrari_F430_exterior-detail-view

The meticulous work that has gone into optimising airflow through the car has given rise to a number of carefully contoured scoops and vents along the cars’ sides and rear. In fact, even the wing mirrors now have specially profiled twin mounting arms that channel the airflow smoothly towards the engine intakes. The cars’muscular stance has been further enhanced by stylistic and functional elements including the Enzo-inspired tail-lights which protrude from the bodywork, and the generous nolder incorporated into the engine cover.

The models’ vertically stacked headlights are extremely compact too, thanks to the use of Bi-xenon technology.

The F430 Spider is the only uncompromising mid-rear engined drop-top to boast a compact, fully automatic electric hood that allows the engine to be seen at all times. This stylistic flourish comes courtesy of a soft top system designed to take up very little space indeed.

Ferrari_F430_lateral-view

official video

Innovations

Manettino and  vehicle set-up

The F430 Spider driver can change the set-up of his car using the innovative selector mounted on the steering wheel.

Just like in Formula 1, F430 and F430 Spider drivers can change various areas of the set-up of their car using a single selector set on the steering wheel. The manettino, as it is known to the Scuderia Ferrari drivers, is a commutator switch that has been adopted directly from racing.

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Ferrari_F430-spider_detail-view-manettino

This switch quickly and simply controls the electronics governing suspension settings, the CSTstability and traction control, E-Diff and the change speed of the F1 transmission, as well as F1 gearbox shifting times. The manettino enables car settings to be changed to suit personal preferences, road surface conditions and available grip. The settings available to the driver have been concentrated in five different strategies, enabling them to be changed to suit personal preferences, road surface conditions and available grip:

Ferrari_F430-spider_detail-view-manettino

ICE: performance is significantly restricted (maximum intervention by the stability and traction control) for maximum stability – indispensable for driving in very slippery conditions (snow or ice).

LOW GRIP: this position ensures stability both on dry and wet surfaces. It is therefore recommended for surfaces with poor grip (rain), gritty roads or particularly broken or undulating blacktop.

SPORT: this is the standard setting that strikes the best balance between stability and performance. Ideal for the open road, this position provides an optimum compromise between maximum performance and safety.

RACE: this setting must be used only on the race track. Gear changing is even faster to minimise gear shift times. CST intervention is reduced to a minimum. The suspension control increases a level too.

CST: activates or deactivates the stability and traction control. With the manettino set to off, the driver has full control over the carreactions. The only driver aids that remain active are those that cannot be overridden such as ABS and EBD (electronic brake distribution).

Both coupé and Spider boast uncompromising forged aluminium, double unequal-length wishbone suspension set-ups front and rear with antidive and antisquat geometries. New-generation software manages their adaptive suspension to provide the perfect balance between handling and comfort. The 19” rims are fitted with 225/35 tyres at the front and 285/35 at the rear. There is also the option of run-flat tyres combined with electronic pressure control.

Ferrari_F430-spider_detail-view-manettino

Shaped into  Ferrari Wind Tunnel

Developed employing the same approach (and Wind Tunnel) as that of the F1 team.

The wind tunnel testing carried out to hone the F430 and F430 Spider’s aerodynamics use exactly the same criteria as employed for the F1 single-seaters. Thus Ferrari’s engineers have been able to modulate the air flow both around the car, as well as under it, to perfection. The result is a highly efficient configuration that channels air flow for maximum downforce and thus grip. Similarly air is channelled to the engine to increase power as well as optimise the cooling of the transmission, and to the brakes for maximum response even under the heaviest use. Perfecting the cars’ aerodynamics has brought about a 50% increase in downforce compared to the 360 Modena.

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Ferrari_F430-spider_detail-view-aerodynamics
Ferrari_F430-spider_detail-view-aerodynamics

Lengthy development of the shape and the angle of attack of the new spoiler at the bottom of the front bumper resulted in an impressive increase in downforce over the front axle – up to 130 kg for the F430 and 125 kg for the F430 Spider-which contributes in no uncertain manner to longitudinal vehicle stability and steering precision. Similarly the nolder on the trailing edge of the engine cover works in conjunction with the new diffuser between the rear wheels to increase downforce over the rear axle.

The diffuser features similar fences (deflectors) to those used on Ferrari’s single-seaters, and increases the speed of air flow under the tail of the car creating an area of depression and ground effect that pulls the car down. The two intakes for the engine are positioned over the driven wheels in an area of high flow pressure, thus guaranteeing a greater volume of air to the intake manifold. At high speeds, in fact, ram-effect induction accounts for 1% of the engine’s maximum power (490 hp).

Ferrari_F430_three-quarter-view-lateral-view-aerodynamics

Transmission &
F1 gearbox

The F1 gearbox introduces a number of important innovations, thanks to input from Gestione Sportiva engineers.

The 6-speed gearbox incorporates multicone synchronizers, while both the 6th gear and the final drive have been lengthened to make the most of the greater power and torque of the new engine. Thanks to that ongoing development, Ferrari’s F1 gearbox for the F430 is state of the art, introducing a number of important modifications: thanks to inputs from the engineers on the Gestione Sportiva racing side, the F1 gearbox management incorporates a new control strategy which further perfects gearchange speed and smoothness under hard use.

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Ferrari_F430-spider_detail-view-gearbox
Ferrari_F430-spider_detail-view-gearbox

Changing gear takes just 150 milliseconds, as measured by the “hole” in acceleration during the change. As well as increasing the speed of changes during hard driving, the new software improves smoothness in the fully automatic mode (actuated by a button on the central tunnel), making the F430 a true all-rounder. At the opposite extreme, the F43′s LAUNCH CONTROL (not available in North America) gives maximum performance away from a standing start with suitable road conditions (for example, on the track).

Capote

The only uncompromising, mid-engined drop-top to boast a compact, fully automatic electric hood that keeps the engine visible at all times.

The electric roof is fully automatic and folds away completely, so that the engine is always visible, despite the Spider’s uncompromising central-rear engine layout.

Read more
Ferrari_F430-spider_lateral-view-capote
Ferrari_F430-spider_front-three-quarter-view-capote

The F430 Spider has been developed using exactly the same engineering approach to computer development models and Wind Tunnel testing as used by the F1 team. Ferrari engineers have been able to modulate the air flow both around the car, as well as under it, and the result is a highly efficient configuration that channels air flow for maximum down-force and grip. Similarly, air is channelled to the engine to both increase power as well as optimise cooling of transmission and brakes, even under heaviest use. Perfecting the F430 Spider’s aerodynamics has brought about a 50% increase in down-force compared to the 360 Modena, thus increasing high-speed stability and the car’s active safety.

At 200 km/h, that figure equates to 45 kg more down-force than the 360 Modena; this becomes 85 kg at 300 km/h, amounting to a total of 280 kg. The significant progress made in the car’s aerodynamics is also reflected in the improvement of the ratio between the coefficient of down-force (Cl) and the drag coefficient (Cd), with a 40% improvement over the 360 Modena. This result was in part achieved by including a new spoiler at the bottom of the front bumper where it cleaves ‘clean’ air, i.e. air that’s undisturbed by the turbulence generated around the body of the vehicle. Lengthy development of the shape and the angle of attack of the spoiler resulted in an increase in down-force over the front axle – up to 130 kg – which contributes to longitudinal vehicle stability and steering precision.

Ferrari_F430-spider_lateral-view-capote

The nolder on the trailing edge of the engine cover works in conjunction with the new diffuser between the rear wheels. The latter features similar fences (deflectors) to those used on Ferrari’s single-seaters, and increases the speed of air flow under the tail of the car creating an area of depression and ground effect that pulls the car down. In this conformation, the underbody actively helps increase down-force to a maximum of 150 kg over the rear axle. Aerodynamic development also played a part in extracting the maximum performance from the new 4.3-litre V8. The two intakes for the engine are positioned over the wheels in an area of high flow pressure, thus guaranteeing a greater volume of air to the intake manifold.

Ferrari_F430-spider_lateral-view-capote

At high speeds, in fact, ram-effect induction accounts for 1% of the engine’s maximum power (490 hp). There is a new specific cooling system that makes the most of the new air intakes at the front, and the flow over the radiators positioned ahead of the wheels. Hot air from the radiators escapes through vents on the sides of the front bumpers in an area of vacuum that maximises the extraction effect. The engine compartment is cooled by air from two intakes set into the front of the rear wheel arches. The air is channelled and distributed to critical areas with a high thermal load to provide optimum cooling even under hard use. The brakes benefit from a greater air flow thanks to larger intakes and bigger diameter ducting. The new wheel design also helps maximise the expulsion of hot air from the brake discs to match their increased performance.

E-diff  electronic differencial

On the road, E-Diff is a formidable technological refinement that improves road-holding and stability.

The electronic differential has been used for many years on F1 single-seaters to transfer massive torque levels to the track whatever the surface conditions. In competition, in fact, the E-Diff guarantees maximum grip out of bends, eliminating wheel spin.

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Ferrari_F430-spider_detail-view-e-diff
Ferrari_F430-spider

On the road it is a formidable technological refinement that improves roadholding and stability. Torque is continuously and optimally distributed between the wheels via two sets of friction discs (one for each driveshaft) controlled by a hydraulic actuator.

The amount of torque actually transmitted to the driven wheels depends on driving conditions (accelerator pedal angle, steering angle, yaw acceleration, individual wheel rotation speed) and brings considerable advantages in terms of performance, direction stability, active safety and handling feedback.

Increasing  downforce

The underbody actively helps increase down-force, to a maximum of 150 kg over the rear axle.

The nolder on the trailing edge of the engine cover works in conjunction with the new diffuser between the rear wheels The latter features similar fences (deflectors) to those used on Ferrari’s single-seaters, and increases the speed of air flow under the tail of the car creating an area of depression and ground effect that pulls the car down. In this conformation, the underbody actively helps increase downforce to a maximum of 150 kg over the rear axle. Aerodynamic development also had a part in extracting the maximum performance from the new 4.3-litre V8. The two intakes for the engine are positioned over the driven wheels in an area of high flow pressure, thus guaranteeing a greater volume of air to the intake manifold.

Ferrari_F430-spider_detail-view-underbody

Focus On

Focus on the  engine

The visible engine

The F430 Spider is the only uncompromising, mid-engined drop-top to boast a compact, fully automatic electric hood that keeps the engine visible at all times. This stylistic flourish comes courtesy of a soft-top system designed to take up very little space indeed.

Read more
Ferrari-F430-spider-engine-view
Ferrari_F430-spider_engine-view

From F40 to F430 and F430 Spider

The sensational F40 of 1987 was the first Ferrari to put its engine on public display. Its Pininfarina shaping required a gradually sloping rear roof shape to provide good airflow over its rear wing, which could only be accomplished by making the rear deck and the window one and the same. Made of the tough plastic Lexan, the F40′s window was pieced by vents for cooling of its turbocharged engine.

Similar requirements applied during the aerodynamic development of the 360 Modena. Its creators wanted to avoid the detaching of the airflow that occurred over the recessed rear window of its predecessor the F355. The aim was a smooth flow over the entire rear deck until an abrupt break was reached at the top of its high, cut-off tail. Instead of a rear wing or spoiler, downforce was generated by the 360′s fully enclosed underbody.

The solution again was to provide a glazed area set into the smooth rear deck that served as the rear window and, by the way, also provided an excellent view of the four-camV8 engine. This 1999 innovation was carried forward to the Enzo in 2002 and to the F430 as well. It’s an apt and appealing way to flaunt a feature of every Ferrari that is, after all, at its very heart.

Ferrari-F430-spider-engine-view

Specifications

V8 Engine

Overall length 177.6 in
Overall width 75.7 in
Height 48.6 in
Wheelbase 102.4 in
Front track 65.7 in
Rear track 63.6 in
Dry weight 3130 lb*
Kerb weight 3351 lb*
Type 90° V8
Bore/stroke 3.62 x 3.19 in
Unit displacement 32.9 cu in
Total displacement 262.9 cu in
Compression ratio 11.3:1
Maximum power 360.3 kW (490 CV) at 8500 rpm
Maximum torque 465 Nm (343 lbft) at 5250 rpm
Maximum speed over 193 mph
0-100 km/h (0-62 mph) 4.1 s
Combined 15.2 l/100 km
Combined 345 g/km
* European market version